Monday, April 21, 2014
Sunday, April 20, 2014 Tuesday, October 1, 2013

volatiledesign:

A very interesting piece from conception to birth for designer Thomas Feichtner. Feichtner worked with reknown producer Eternit AG of Austria whom has collaborated with the legendary Le Corbusier and Willy Guhl. The conception of the Basso Shelf system began with exploration and sustainability of fibre cement and its journey as a material from then to now. It is considered one of the most environmentally friendly materials and is what composes the form of this tripartite, modular shelf system that is connected by wooden pegs. The effect the fibre cement has, due to their cement molds in production, really gives a fabric like quality to material that is hard as a rock. The final finish on the piece is very interesting too because photographically it reads like felt. It begins very industrial in concept and finishes very elegantly. What is also very cool about this piece is the fact that it could be used for multiple functions like a bench with magazine storage below or on casters as a rolling kitchen island… the possibilities are endless since the framework is so flexible!

(Source: volatiledesign)

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

landscape35mm:

kylelabow:

cosascool:

‘Bourrasque’ light installation by Paul Cocksedge in Lyon

Reblog Sunday

Friday, June 7, 2013

architectureland:

Trollveggen service designed by Reiulf Ramstad Architecs in  Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Monday, June 3, 2013
imaginingcities:

Built environment typologies.

imaginingcities:

Built environment typologies.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013
bluepueblo:

Sunken Alcove Garden, New Zealand
photo via besttravelphotos

bluepueblo:

Sunken Alcove Garden, New Zealand

photo via besttravelphotos

Monday, April 29, 2013

abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings.

For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement.

The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

relooklab29:

BRING NATURE INSIDE